Olive Green Swamp Grasshopper

Meet Paroxya clavuliger, the olive green swamp grasshopper. This unassuming little spur-throated grasshopper is about 3-4 cm long (females are larger), and is also known as the salt marsh grasshopper and hoosier grasshopper. Both sexes are primarily green to greenish-black, with black eyes, and a dark stripe through each eye, also running down the pronotum….

Admirable Grasshopper

I can see where this gorgeously striped and spotted green grasshopper got her common name — she is truly an admirable grasshopper! (She must have just molted, her colors are so bright!) Also known as the handsome grasshopper, Syrbula admirabilis is a species of slant-faced grasshopper from the family Acrididae. This individual is about 3.5…

Collared Ground Cricket

I am somewhat nervous about this identification. The collared ground cricket (Neonemobius nr. mormonius) which is found in Florida may or may not be the same species as the geographically separate mormon ground cricket (Neonemobius mormonius), which lives in the western US. All I can say is that this dainty little (probably juvenile) girl is…

Green Trig Cricket

This tiny beast, about 3mm long without, and 8mm long with, the antennae, is a nymph of a green trig cricket or green sword-tailed cricket, a member of the genus Cyrtoxipha. Cyrtoxipha means “curved sword”, and refers to the females’ ovipositor. “Trig” comes from the subfamily name for sword-tailed crickets, Trigonidiinae. This is either C….

Green-Striped Grasshopper

This is a nymph of the green-striped grasshopper, Chortophaga viridifasciata. The adults are…well, let’s say they’re variable in color, so this little one may be brown when it grows up, or green, or possibly a shade of neon pink with bright green wings (there are multiple subspecies, or possibly not, involved, and it’s all very…

Florida Giant Katydid

I love insects with definitive identifications. When I type “big green katydid” into Google, this bad boy pops right up (along with suggestions that I search for “Florida giant grasshopper”, “Florida giant centipede”, and “Florida giant mosquito”, making me wonder why I moved to this state). And it’s exactly like it says on the tin…

Blue-Winged Grasshopper

This photo was taken in Costa Maya in 2019. (I’m walking around visiting ancient ruins — Kohunlich, for the curious — and taking photos of insects. I know, I have problems.) These little red-and-black insects are juvenile (probably about second instar) blue-winged grasshopper nymphs (Tropidacris collaris) clustering together. As adults, they’ll be huge — up…

Slender Meadow Katydid Nymph

This is not an adult; it’s a mid-range instar (aka nymph, aka baby). You can tell because it has no wings — adults have long, reddish wings which extend past the end of their body. In a couple more molts/instars, the wings will emerge! This tiny little creature (about 5mm long) took a ride on…

Cave Cricket

This photo was taken in 2012 during a visit to Mammoth Cave in Kentucky. Just as we were leaving, I had the misfortune to look up and find dozens of these huge, long-legged crickets crawling along the ceiling! Cave crickets (there are several species, but the one specifically living in Mammoth Cave is Hadenoecus subterraneus)…

Broad-tipped Conehead Katydid

Slender, untapered antennae and nearly round eyes distinguish this broad-tipped conehead katydid (Neoconocephalus triops) from some very similar-looking toothpick grasshoppers. About three inches long, and apparently they make some pretty funky noises.

Eastern Lubber Grasshopper

Almost four inches long, these massive insects come in a variety of colors from light yellow to almost black. Photos taken at Oakland Nature Preserve, Florida.